CBS Sports: It Is Time

 

The headline read: 

 

CBS Sports to Make TV History with All Female Sports Talk Show This Fall   The Big Lead

History.

[tweet https://twitter.com/thebiglead/status/497837776461520896 align=’center’]

An all-female sports talk show? YES!

Before anyone gets the wrong idea, I’m not a female sports fan. I’m not a champion of all things women’s sports. I’m just a sports fan. Period.

For years, the sports media industry has relegated female sports journalists to very specific roles. Sideline reporter is number one on that list. If you’re a pretty blonde and you work in sports, there’s a good chance you’ll land a job as a sideline reporter somewhere in this country. Sure, there are female sports anchors, but how many are there to actually “discuss” sports? There simply isn’t enough time on a sportscast to hear an anchor’s opinion.

Then along came that story above from The Big Lead. The premise of it is exciting. A show with an all-female panel that is just talking sports? Not women’s sports – just sports! Terrific news, right? Well, I thought so initially. Heck, I’d want to be on that.  

Then, I started reading some tweets from folks who know the business far better than me. 

[tweet https://twitter.com/thefootballgirl/status/499233715231674369 align=’center’] [tweet https://twitter.com/thefootballgirl/status/499234138797662210 align=’center’] [tweet https://twitter.com/thefootballgirl/status/499234690344431616 align=’center’]

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[tweet https://twitter.com/stevelepore/status/499248556713443328 align=’center’] [tweet https://twitter.com/stevelepore/status/499248992321302528 align=’center’] [tweet https://twitter.com/stevelepore/status/499249218415263744 align=’center’] [tweet https://twitter.com/stevelepore/status/499250265015738368 align=’center’]

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Stepping stone or network gimmick?

I would hope a stepping stone and beyond. For women like me, we want to talk about sports. Not just women’s sports either. I want to talk about college football or basketball. Whether it’s on Twitter or more so on Google+, talking about sports is fun and insightful to me. Call me crazy, but this thing called dialogue…well, I like that! 

And that’s part of my hope for this new show from CBS. I’ve been trying to do something along those lines on Google+ with my show Tuesday Ten. Showing that a woman can talk about sports, in my case sports-social media, beyond the reasons of looks alone. Not saying I’m a beauty or anything like that — but it’s about being on camera for who you are on the inside too. Having someone of Amy Trask’s stature on that show (per The Big Lead), that’s saying something to me. That’s telling me that CBS knows there needs to be a platform to feature someone like Trask or Lesley Visser.

Maybe it’s a naive way to look at things, but that’s my hope. That this won’t be a gimmick by CBS Sports. Steve Lepore is right in his tweets above that sports media needs a change from within. More women decision-makers or, at the very least, less of an all-boys club. More people who are willing to think outside the box. For now though, the show needs to be an investment – a long-term investment in women who love talking about sports. 

It is time. 

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CadChica Sports

 Google+ Hangouts are only going to grow in 2014. Learn from the Master, Ronnie Bincer, and his Hangout Mastery group – join through my affiliate link.

#SMsports Q&A With My Twitter Friends #2

Never be afraid to learn from others

Twitter is a  necessary tool in today’s sports media. I believe the sports media was a key demographic in Twitter’s growth. There isn’t a week that goes by that I don’t learn something new about sports, whether it’s in-game news, social media, business, technology, sponsorship, or even relationship dynamics. Learning is part of the Twitter process for me.

Today is the second installment in my planned weeklong Q&A series discussing social media-sports (#SMsports) with my Twitter “friends”. Yesterday was the first installment with Andrew Bucholtz and Lisa Horne. My line-up today features:

Tim Cary – @TimCaryCBS Sports Social Media Editor

Kristi Dosh – @SportsBizMissESPN Sports Business Reporter, Author, Attorney and Radio Host

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1. Please tell me a little bit of your background and how it relates to sports.

Cary: I am one of two social media editors for CBSSports.com, and have been in that role for nearly three years. I have been a sports fan my whole life, and have dabbled in writing, live-blogging, announcing, coaching, etc. – pretty much everything but playing! So when I’m working, I’m watching sports. When I’m not working…well…I’m still watching sports!

Dosh: I’m currently a sports business reporter at ESPN, having previously reported on sports business at Forbes and Comcast Sports Southeast. Prior to my career in sports media, I was a practicing attorney. I’ve authored two books on sports business topics, Saturday Millionaires: How Winning Football Builds Winning Colleges (published September 2013) and Balancing Baseball: How Collective Bargaining Has Changed the Major Leagues (due out in 2014). 

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 2. What was the first social media outlet that you used?

Cary: I started on Facebook first, and then Twitter. My personal preference is Twitter (and honestly, it’s not close!), and I’ve enjoyed using that to network with people in sports media over the past few years. In fact, I found my current job because I was following my now-boss on Twitter.

Dosh: Facebook was the first social media outlet I used personally, but Twitter was the first I used professionally. I’m currently on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest. For professional use, I find Twitter to be the most valuable – from industry Twitter chats to breaking news, Twitter is the one social media network I can’t live without professionally.

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2A. How often do you use other social networks like Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Vine, Tumblr, Pinterest for either personal or professional use? Which of those is your top preference? Least? Please describe your reasoning behind it.

Cary: I operate the @CBSSports pages on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, so sharing our content on those three platforms consumes much of my day. Like probably anyone in social media, I’ve dabbled in each of the networks you mentioned, but I don’t have a lot of extra time to experiment on a personal level. I like to interact with others and get news/headlines/content, so I tend to spend more time on Twitter to see what’s going on vs. some of the image-driven sites like Instagram, Vine, and Pinterest.

Dosh: I maintain both a personal Facebook account and a professional page on Facebook. I’ve found Pinterest to be most helpful in planning my wedding, but I’m always exploring new ways to use it professionally. I’m increasingly using Instagram to share photos when I travel for professional assignments and events and to follow others in the industry. I’ve found Instagram allows me to connect with others on a more personal level, because people often most photos that aren’t necessarily from professional endeavors. While I always advise people to focus on using these platforms for professional development, I think it’s important to sprinkle in (appropriate) personal facts, stories, and photos now and then to connect with people on a more personal level.

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3. What were the primary motives for your engagement in social media?

Cary: I used Facebook initially to connect with friends from college. My interest in Twitter was specifically related to my then-amateur sports writing hobby/career pursuit. I realized early on that it was a great way to share my content with an interested audience, and the relationships I’ve developed online have been invaluable to me. I have literally thousands of friends I never would have gotten to know if it hadn’t been for social media.

Dosh: I joined Twitter at the behest of an editor after I received my first book deal. Four years later I can say it’s the best move I ever made professionally. I’ve used Twitter to develop relationships with others in the industry, to share and promote my work, to enhance my research by engaging with sports fans, and to increase my own knowledge of the sports world.

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4.  In terms of Twitter, I like to call it the world’s largest sports bar. Discuss, trash-talk, meet new people all while you’re watching a game “together”. Is Twitter the best place to discuss sports in this social media age we are in? Why or why not?

Cary: I think it is, and I think a lot of the fun is finding the right people to follow. A lot of my follows are from the sports realm, and it’s amazing to see Kobe Bryant hit a buzzer-beater at 1 am ET, then open my phone a few seconds later and look at three or four DOZEN exclamation mark-filled tweets all sent at the same instant, even in the ‘middle of the night.’ News consistently shows up first on Twitter. Not TV. Not radio. Not newspapers. So for a sports fan who wants the very latest news, you have to be on Twitter.

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5. How long have you been on Twitter? What have been the biggest changes you’ve seen on the social network since you joined? Biggest upsides? Drawbacks?

Cary: I joined Twitter in March 2009. The biggest change I’ve seen is simply the number of people who now have an account and the integration with seemingly every product/brand/TV show/team/you name it.

I like following back when I meet interesting people, and I probably follow more accounts than most (over 3,000). The biggest drawback is I don’t get to read every single tweet. But I’d still rather have that connection and relationship and be accessible for strangers that could become friends, even if stuff slips through the cracks sometimes because I’m following what some would say is ‘too many’ people. I’ve met dozens of Twitter friends in real life, and turning online friendships into flesh-and-blood friendships has been one of my favorite parts of embracing social media.

Dosh: I’ve been on Twitter for four years. The biggest change is probably how much news is broken on Twitter now. I think Twitter is the best social media network for professional development if you’re interested in working in sports, because virtually everyone who works in sports is on Twitter. Not only can you connect with people you might otherwise not have access to, but there are industry chats to participate in and news is often broken on Twitter. The biggest drawback is that you can’t always trust the breaking news you see on Twitter. In the rush to be the first, many have jumped the gun on reporting “news.”

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 6. SI just came out with their Twitter 100 list of top sports accounts to follow. In your opinion, how valuable are these lists? Do you follow many of these accounts (describe reasonings please)? Do you have a top 5 of Twitter accounts to follow (sports or non-sports)? If so, who are they? 

Cary: The Twitter 100 list is a nice idea, but one of the great things about Twitter is no two people really follow the exact same accounts. Everyone has different tastes, interests, and specialties. I would say I follow the best reporters on the Twitter 100 list, but not most of the athletes/other personalities. If a star player tweets something important, it will show up on my timeline a bunch of other times because it’ll get thousands of RTs. So, I don’t follow a lot of players outside my personal favorite teams. In my opinion, the SI list got a few right and missed on some others, but every person is going to have their own take on that and it’s not worth nit-picking.

Dosh: I always check out these lists to see if there’s anyone I don’t follow who I should be following. The lists are valuable because I almost always find someone I didn’t know about who becomes a good follow. I usually check out the person’s last 10 tweets or so, and if there’s anything valuable or interesting then I give them a follow. I don’t have a top 5 list to follow, because I think you should be following people who best align with your own interests, which is obviously going to vary from person to person.

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7. Piggybacking on that question a bit with a two-parter: It feels like the negativity is greater than ever on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram. How much negativity have you dealt with in social media? Has it affected your use of the social networks (i.e. how often you log on to them)?

Cary: Yes, there is way too much negativity on social media…but there is also way too much negativity in the world as a whole. So I don’t cut back my usage of Twitter or Facebook because people say stupid things…I just tune out the ones who don’t have anything worthwhile to say.

Dosh: I have absolutely dealt with negativity on social media. The downside to providing easy access to others is that readers of your work can quickly and easily find you. That being said, my positive experiences have far outnumbered the negative. I’ve never had something so negative that it impacted my use of social media.

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7a. Are there any sports accounts that try to share more of the positive side of sports? Those who may be using social media to show there’s more than what happens on the court/field?

Cary: I think teams’ official accounts do a good job of highlighting what their players/coaches are involved with off the court/field. For as many arrests/idiotic decisions that get blared across the headlines, there are at least that many sports personalities who are using their influence to do good, and they don’t get enough credit. One sports account that jumps to mind: @ChaplainMarty. It’s neat to get a glimpse of athletes at my favorite school (Purdue) taking mission trips to Haiti and South Africa in their free time to serve the less fortunate.

Dosh: The first person who comes to mind is my friend Alicia Jessop (@RulingSports). It’s her mission to highlight the positive things athletes are doing off the field, and she does a great job of it.

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 8. With social media changing/innovating at such a rapid pace, especially at the sports level what is your outlook for social media and sports?  Where do you see sports going with social media?

Cary: They say the only thing constant is change, and sports/social media is a good example of that. It’s thrilling/scary/fascinating to work in a field where the technology and best practices are constantly evolving. I expect even more teams to add in-house social media reporters that don’t just post in-game updates to Twitter, but are dedicated to bringing fans the best beat coverage around the clock in 140 characters or less. Also look for sports stadiums/arenas to spend major time/effort/money upgrading in-venue cell/data service so fans don’t have to stay home to tweet during the game.

Dosh: When I guest lecture at universities, I always tell students they have to be on social media (particularly Twitter) if they want to work in sports. I think that is becoming more true with every passing day. There is no better way to have your thumb on the pulse of sports, and there are incredible networking opportunities.

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 9. Any final comments you’d like to add?

Cary: Not really. I just wanted to say thank you for including me and for those who may be reading this, feel free to reach out to me on Twitter – I’d love to talk sports with some new friends!

Dosh: If you want to use social media for professional development, my rule is to keep your content 90% professional and 10% personal. I think it’s important to work in personal details here and there, but your main focus should be sharing information pertinent to your career goals.

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THANK YOU Tim and Kristi. I appreciate your time.

** Follow Tim on Twitter – @TimCary or @CBSSports

** Follow Kristi on Twitter – @KristiDosh or check out www.kristidosh.com or her new book Saturday Millionaires

Up tomorrow: Freddie Coleman from ESPN Radio and Duane Rollins from Canadian Soccer News.

***

CadChica Sports

Sports On TV: Twitter Power

50+ seconds left in the game.

Arizona needed the win.

UCLA needed the win.

It had been a back and forth game in the last few minutes when all of a sudden I hear this. BOOM! Another game came on my tv. Needless to say…..

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Slightly miffed comes to mind. Perhaps slightly stronger. Living in Pac-12 country, there should not have been a switch from MY game. Nevertheless, my tweet came with a quick response.

Craig Stanke is the deputy managing editor at CBSSports.com. While I was appreciative of his quick tweet reply, it actually was referring to a different game that CBS was airing. And so I replied:

Again. Immediate response from Mr. Stanke.

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I kid you not….within just a few minutes (an eternity in college basketball terms), the game was back on. Long enough for me to see Arizona win. (Woo Hoo).

Was it because of my tweet? I’d like to think so. In the old days, you’d have to call your local station to complain and hope that your complaint was actually heard. But with Twitter, fans have direct access to networks, sports media, teams, athletes, league officials and more. It gives fans a voice like never before.

I used my voice. CBS Sports responded. So I can think of no better way to thank them than…tweeting and posting about it:

Thank you Craig Stanke and CBS Sports.

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CadChica Sports

Spanning the Twitterverse: #BruceFreed

Spanning the Twitterverse to bring you the constant variety of tweets
The thrill of the retweet and the agony of the unfollow
The human drama of the twitter timeline
This is CadChica’s Wide World of Tworts

#FreeBruce

A hashtag that has lived since July 14, 2011.

And today, it died a quick death.

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Just like that the sports Twitterverse exploded.

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http://twitter.com/#!/TheBigLead/status/109280330632019968

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The whole #FreeBruce saga is one that is probably confusing to most people; fans mostly. Unless you were on Twitter on July 14th, you probably had no idea what was going on. I touched on it in my post the very next day. To get the full gist of it though, I would recommend reading this story by the website that broke the news on Twitter that day.

Feldman did something that his then employer, ESPN, didn’t like; apparently with their full knowledge and approval. When that ‘something’ became a “problem”, ESPN allegedly lowered the boom and ‘suspended’ him. Twitter blew-up that day which I addressed in my post. Based on what I read, reaction thereafter, and Feldman’s near-silence since that day, it’s kind of hard to discount the story. Here was the SportsbyBrooks reaction:

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Here’s some reaction from folks at ESPN:

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I feel like sometimes I wish a story would end sooner rather than later. This one definitely didn’t end quickly. Bruce Feldman went on a “semi”-media blitz this morning. I think only one show is worth mentioning here and that is The Dan Patrick Show. Patrick, himself a former ESPN-er, asked all the right questions; you can listen to it here. Feldman came out on fire toward his former employer. He also touched on the subject in his first article on cbssports.com.

One of the things he said was regarding ESPN’s ombudsman, The Poynter Institute. The Poynter Institute, aka Kelly McBride, wrote about the Feldman firestorm in July. Feldman, to paraphrase what he said on Patrick’s show, said the Poynter response was filled with inaccuracies.

Okay, fine. Here is what I find interesting: ESPN’s Mike Soltys said they’d have no further comment. ESPN’s ombudsman from The Poynter Institute, Kelly McBride, couldn’t leave well enough alone. She wrote the ESPN ombudsman article on Feldman. Naturally, since Feldman said her article was “filled with inaccuracies”, she wants to set things right from her perspective. I get it.

But she takes to Twitter to confront Feldman about his comments. Think about that for a minute.

This is something that would never have come to light were it not for Twitter. That said, who in their right mind as someone in her position, calls someone out using social media. She’s not just a writer or reporter. She represents The Poynter Institute whose mission statement is:

The Poynter Institute is a school dedicated to teaching and inspiring journalists and media leaders. It promotes excellence and integrity in the practice of craft and in the practical leadership of successful businesses. It stands for a journalism that informs citizens and enlightens public discourse. It carries forward Nelson Poynter’s belief in the value of independent journalism in the public interest.

Where exactly does calling someone out on Twitter fit in that mission statement? Maybe it’s the “enlightens public discourse” part. Other than that, what could she gain by tweeting that? As the “ombudsman” for one of the most recognizable sports media companies, shouldn’t one have a better understanding of ‘think before you tweet’? From a sports fan’s perspective, I should hope so.

I can honestly say that I am learning more and more about the media business every day. Some days, are not very pretty. Nevertheless, this story is done. Bruce is “free” to write for CBS. The saga is over. Maybe. We can only hope right?  

But until then, we always have:

TWEET OF THE DAY

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CadChica Sports

Spanning the Twitterverse: Mike Flanagan

Spanning the Twitterverse to bring you the constant variety of tweets
The thrill of the retweet and the agony of the unfollow
The human drama of the twitter timeline
This is CadChica’s Wide World of Tworts

Life often crosses into sports in ways that sometimes, we like to forget.

As yesterday’s post about Pat Summitt proved, part of the enjoyment of sports is relationship. Relationships between coach, players, fans and media are all intertwined, with what takes place on the field/court/pitch as well as off it. What happens to a team and those associated with it, often goes to the core of a fan’s heart. There was great reaction to the medical diagnosis of “early onset dementia” for Summitt. Those reactions, I believe, were brought on because of the relationship we have with Coach Summitt.

It’s not that most of us “know” her personally. It’s that we’ve seen her on television or at a game. We’ve seen or heard her at games or in interviews. We’ve read articles about her. It’s almost as if we “know” her through that and feel a connection or rather, a relationship with her. 

Relationships were on full effect today again in the Twitterverse.

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It was late today that the tweet below came across:

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Whoa. Shocking to say the least.

I remember watching him pitch on tv, growing up. I wasn’t an Orioles fan but I was a baseball fan. The Orioles were one of the great teams that you just “knew” about. If you were a baseball fan, you knew about Earl Weaver, their great teams & how fantastic their pitching was. As such, you knew who Mike Flanagan was. 

By the time many read this, we’ll know more details as to his death. Knowledge, in this case, doesn’t make it any easier, not that anything will. But maybe for the folks below and Orioles’ fans everywhere, the healing process can begin.

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TWEET OF THE DAY

Today’s tweet of the day, two actually, can come from none other than current Orioles’ pitcher, Jeremy Guthrie, who happens to wear the same #46 that Mike Flanagan wore. Surprising to nobody, he pitched for the Orioles tonight in their 6-1 victory over the Twins. Quite appropriate.

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CadChica Sports

Spanning the Twitterverse: Friday Fun Tweets

Spanning the Twitterverse to bring you the constant variety of tweets
The thrill of the retweet and the agony of the unfollow
The human drama of the twitter timeline
This is CadChica’s Wide World of Tworts

The last couple of days have been quite a challenge for me. Today especially, I have been a bit under the weather physically and exhausted mentally. But, I will always make time for Friday Fun Tweets albeit an early edition. Friday Fun Tweets: a collection of tweets from the past week that made me smile, chuckle, laugh out loud or just made me go “HUH?”. Enjoy.

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NFL/PRO FOOTBALL

Admit it. You’ve thought exactly the same thing Chris Harris at some point in your life right?

http://twitter.com/#!/ChrisHarrisNFL/status/101264575076376576

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Hut-One Fish, Hut-Two Fish, Romeo and Juliet – HIKE!

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At first, I thought Twitter would enhance profiles of athletes and media. After this offseason, it’s doing the same thing for agents too. Very interesting.

http://twitter.com/#!/JRRickert/status/100320215371481088

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So this one isn’t exactly about football but if you can compare Mr. Irrelevant with Congress, you have my attention. ((Thought: wonder who would be Mr./Ms. Irrelevant in a Congress draft? All of them maybe?))

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UFL news this week. They are still going to have a season but with 4 teams. The best summation of this news?

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Above, there was Mr. Irrelevant & Congress, now we have Lady Gaga & Oregon. Truth be told though, Dan Greenspan did say later “@ocruscblog came up with the Oregon/Lady Gaga, so credit to him.”. Still funny.

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College football seems like a year-round job for media (just like other sports, I know). This is the first I heard of it interfering with nuptials. Too funny. Best wishes to him & his future wife.

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I have yet to hear a guy scream like a girl. However, I can imagine many guys around the country feel like this:

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GOLF

The PGA championship started today. Tiger was back. But not in old-Tiger form. Is it the end?

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To get the full effect of this tweet, click on the link in the tweet:

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Tiger-Stevie, Stevie-Tiger, will that story ever end? Not if CBS’ Gregg Doyle can help it.

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A Tiger-less tweet isn’t always the easiest to find when he’s playing but here’s one. US Open champ Rory McIlroy apparently hurt his wrist during the 1st round of play today. Best image I could find is on the New York Times website. I think i could take him.

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SOCCER

I could not pass up some soccer tweets, given that USA-MEXICO played a friendly. Oh and the Premier League is about to start. And La Liga. And Serie A.

Passionate fans out there to be sure. And Twitter can sometimes becoming a venting mechanism for some…..

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This one almost won for Tweet of the Week but I won’t do that. Read it & you can see why.

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And now to USA-MEXICO. It wasn’t exactly a stellar beginning for Jurgen Klinsmann’s coaching debut with the US Men’s National Team. In fact, it was downright ugly the first half. I wasn’t happy when I saw who the starting striker was. This tweet explains my feelings:

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In the 2nd half, Klinsmann brought someone on as a substitute and I’m still shaking my head about it. Ricardo Clark was on the World Cup team. Highly unimpressive to me than and now. So there is this:

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Never let it be said though that last night’s game wasn’t fun at least for a little bit. SI’s Grant Wahl has the Klinsy dance link in this tweet. Clink on the link.

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TWEETS OF THE WEEK

The first runner-up is Colts’ owner Jim Irsay. If you’ve never read his tweets, well, you’re missing out because sometimes they are just OUT THERE. But today, he made sense.

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And now our WINNER. You can see why the tweet above didn’t win. This one is classic Kurt Warner. Smile.

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CadChica Sports

Spanning the Twitterverse: Friday Fun Tweets

Spanning the Twitterverse to bring you the constant variety of tweets
The thrill of the retweet and the agony of the unfollow
The human drama of the twitter timeline
This is CadChica’s Wide World of Tworts

Thank God it is finally Friday. My favorite day of the week. No, it’s not because it’s the last day of the work week (I work 7 days a week — seriously, I do). It’s my favorite because it is Friday Fun Tweets time. Today wasn’t as fun as last week but hey, it’s still Friday and there’s still fun to be found.

I spanned the Twitterverse and came up with these “gems” (or not):

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THE NAME IS JOHN?

The newspaper business isn’t what it used to be. But, you would think that a big sports story like winning golf’s U.S. Open, would bring about some close fact-checking but no.

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IS THIS LIKE, THE DOG ATE MY HOMEWORK?

I’m telling you, the easiest way to understand social media, be it Facebook, Twittter or whatever, is to use some common sense. Unless of course, you don’t have any and then, well…..all bets are off. This story just makes me shake my head.

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ONLY AT WIMBLEDON

This one doesn’t really need explanation, unless of course you don’t know who Serena Williams is. If that’s the case, you’re out of luck (Google it). Aside from that, who would ask this kind of question?

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SO YOU WANT TO BE A MASCOT

Ooh that could be a new reality show!!!  You heard it hear first. Okay networks, call me!!! It’s a brilliant idea. ESPN, are you hearing me? Unless of course you don’t want this to happen to you:

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NO JORDAN, I DON’T WANT TO SIT NEAR YOU

I’m guessing that the Seahawks’ Jordan Babineaux didn’t have Pepcid, Tums or any other antacid at home. Just reading the tweet make my gut hurt.

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I MISS PAUL

For those that don’t remember, Paul the Octopus was the German octopus that correctly predicted games during the 2010 World Cup. If an octopus could roll, I think he’d be rolling in his grave with this tweet:

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NFL: STAND AND _______

The lockout drags on. Negotiations are still ongoing. The Twitterverse is tired of it and so they try to make the best of it.

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TWITTER IS THE BEST FOR:

…facts you won’t get anywhere else. Okay, so you’re tired of me saying it but I LOVE TWITTER. Apparently, I’m not the only one.

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YOU KNOW WE’RE BAD…WE’RE BAD….

Arizona! Bear Down Baby!

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TWEET OF THE NIGHT

For the uninformed, during the basketball season, Klay Thompson thought he had lost his iPod at the hotel room and was late for the team bus. He was benched for the start of Washington State’s game against ASU in Tempe, Arizona. Thus,

CadChica Sports